Tag Archives: discipline

Own it.

Friday Night Lights is one of my all-time favorite TV shows.  In fact, I’ll go ahead and declare it second only to The West Wing for me.

I recently recalled a scene from season 1 where one of the players (“Smash” Williams)  during practice is shouting to one of his slacker teammates (Tim Riggins):

“You’re making us look weak.  If one person fumbles the ball, we all fumble the ball.  If one of us shows up half drunk, we all show up half drunk. We ain’t got time for your games.  We’ve got a game to win.”

Now if you aren’t a Friday Nights Lights fan yet, you can’t appreciate this to the extent that I wish you could, as Smash and Riggins have quite a bit of animosity toward one another, both are talented players, but one is driven and invested and the other is not (at least not yet).

In leadership we talk a lot about the importance of teamwork and recruiting “team players.”  If I have a soapbox about anything, it’s followership.  I’m a big believer in playing well with others and submitting to authority.  However, I realized sitting on an airplane a few days ago that I want more than that out of my team and I think you should, too.

You can get along and help each other out and be supportive all you want, but until you fully commit (that is, until you realize that whether it’s your “job” or not, whether it’s your responsibility or not is fairly inconsequential) simply being a “team player” isn’t enough.

I want a team full of committed, creative, responsible, smart people.

People who realize that our own successes and failures are felt beyond our own individual “portfolios” 

People who realize that we are only as successful individually as we are corporately

People who realize that our failures and our choices aren’t made in a vacuum

People who realize that when one of us fumbles, we all fumble

People who are in it to win it

I want owners, not just players.  Owners know what is at stake.  Owners are personally, emotionally, and financially invested in the success of the endeavor.  Owners don’t blame shift or pass the buck.  They are less interested in how the ball got dropped as much as how we can ensure it doesn’t get dropped again.  Owners are builders and not maintainers.  Owners are a bit restless and a bit hungry.  They have a “what’s next?” attitude that sets them apart.  If we are sticking with the football analogy, these are the ones who keep moving the ball down the field.

Sure, training and experience matter.  But a person who demonstrates a capacity for ownership  and responsibility will distinguish themselves far and away from any lengthy resume.  I’d much prefer to teach someone a skill set than try to cultivate a passion or sense of ownership.  That’s infinitely more difficult to do.

If you find yourself in a position of leadership and are looking to staff a team, look for owners.  We don’t necessarily need teams full of leaders and visionaries so much as we need teams full of owners on every level, in every position.

The work to be done is challenging enough without the added unnecessary task of motivating people to care.  Owners come with care built in already.

If you are looking for a place to serve, applying for a job, joining a team, make the decision to own what you are spending your time and energy on. It will make the work more rewarding and the sacrifices worth it.

I know I’ve mixed metaphors here a bit between sports and business, but I hope the through line is clear enough:

We’ve got a game to win.

And in the words of the best football coach of all time, Coach Eric Taylor:

CLEAR EYES, FULL HEARTS, CAN’T LOSE!

The Discipline of Becoming All Things

We have a document called the Renovatus Manifesto. It’s our code, our culture in written form. It hangs on our walls, it’s on our website, it’s part of our language. One of the themes throughout is the emphasis we place on diversity. It’s really important to us that we honor people of all kinds.

The difficulty in doing that well is that each of us sees the world through our own eyes. We lead from our perspective, our strengths, our convictions. And while I fundamentally believe that to be good and wise, I’m starting to realize the potential blindspots we create by only leading from our own perspective, our strength.

We lose a lot by not disciplining ourselves to consider the perspective of others.

How do you learn? What engages you? What is distracting to you? What do you notice? What do you value? How do you see it?

It is only natural that we gravitate to those who see things the way we do. It is perfectly understandable why we resonate with those who share our opinions and inclinations. But gravity is quite a force and before you know it, our perspective can begin to feel authoritative and superior, as it becomes the only one we acknowledge in ourselves and our like-minded company we keep. We’d never say it that way- no, we’d dress it up in some humble language and explain ourselves using our education, our degrees, our training, our experience, our position.

In the name of protecting the vision or not diluting the mission, we can easily justify our pride, our elitism and close-mindedness, our insecurities and our comfort zones.

We have to see the entire field, consider other vantage points. What is ministry if it’s not a willingness to come alongside someone and walk with them, trying to see from their perspective?

Our worship, our preaching, our programs, our art, our curriculum– all of the church must be built with all of the church in mind. 

Let me be clear: I am not advocating a myriad of ministries to cater to any and every demographic, phase of life, and interest represented in the church.  What I am saying is that the ministries we do have need to stay accessible to the very people for which they were created.

I am also not advocating a futile attempt at trying to please all of the people all of the time. But I’m begging that we are considerate and mindful of them all whenever we can be. I do think we have a responsibility, just as the Apostle Paul did, to become all things to all people in order that we might save some. (I Cor. 9.19-22)

We cannot afford to hold our own inclinations and preferences so tightly that we cannot embrace another’s.

Ministry is messy and self-sacrificing. It requires learning how to speak someone else’s language.  It is incredibly inventive, no matter the “type” of ministry being done.
People worship differently. Children learn differently. We all experience the Lord in a multitude of ways.

For that reason, it is incredibly important that we fight our own personal defaults so that we can be free to think creatively of how we can become all things to all people.  May we cultivate the discipline to pray, learn and try whatever ways we can that lead to effective ministry and the honoring of complex, diverse people made in the image of God.